Stephen Lisgo Earns All-America Honors At NCAA Track Championship

Stephen Lisgo Interview

Junior Stephen Lisgo was the last Butler runner to compete at the 2009 NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championship in Fayetteville, Ark.  And when he completed his race, he walked off the University of Arkansas track with a Butler record and the status of All-American!

For the second time at the national meet, Lisgo had to wait out a weather delay before heading to the start line.  And for the second time, he shook off the delay with a stellar race performance. 

The men’s 3,000 meter steeplechase started two hours later than scheduled, but it didn’t alter Lisgo’s approach.  He kept pace with the best runners in the nation throughout the race and then moved up from sixth place to third in the final lap.  The Butler distance ace crossed the finish line in 8:35.49, just 0:00.37 behind runner-up Hillary Bor of Iowa State.  Kyle Perry of Brigham Young captured the title in 8:29.24.

"Steve had an incredible race tonight," said Butler head coach Matt Roe after Lisgo's performance.  "He moved through the field with great poise and toughness, and he executed flawlessly."

Lisgo’s time smashed the previous Butler steeplechase record of 8:42.5, set by Mark Tucker in 2002.  His third place finish was the best by a Butler runner in the national meet since 2005, when Victoria Mitchell captured a national championship in the steeplechase!

The big finish by Lisgo ended three days of competition for three Butler runners.  Junior Joe MacDonald ended his season in the prelims of the men’s 5,000 meter run, while junior Kris Gauson finished his campaign in the prelims of the men’s 1,500 meter run.  The three were the only runners from the Horizon League competing at the national championship.

"The future is bright for us," added Roe.  "Top to bottom, our men's group has improved tremendously this year.  When you add Steve next year with a fully healthy Kris Gauson and Joe MacDonald with more training under his belt - Wow!  We have the potential to be very dangerous at the NCAA Meet."